Locations used in Wolf Hall

I’m loving the BBC2 production of Wolf Hall adapted from Hilary Mantel’s novels.  I have to admit that I’ve not read the books but everyone says the TV programme keeps well to the feel of the books.

The locations used in the production are in Wiltshire, Dorset or Somerset and all close to us here at Castleton House.  So if your thinking of visiting these wonderful tudor gems why not basing yourself here and you will be able to see them all in a couple of days.  Four of the featured houses are owned by the National Trust, the other – Cothay Manor, is privately owned and has a sensational garden – details of which can be found in my ‘Top 10 Gardens’ page

Cothay Manor, Somerset 

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This delightful medival moated manor house is about 45 minutes away and first came to my attention when it was featured on Country House Rescue.  In Wolf Hall it was the stand-in for Thomas More’s home.  It’s said to be the finest example of a small medieval manor in England and I think it’s a real gem.

Barrington Court, Somerset

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Close to Cothay Manor is the setting for Cardinal Wolsey’s home, York Place in Whitehall.  Whilst it is unfurnished it is well worth a visit and has excellent grounds and gardens.

Montacute House, Somerset

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Provides the setting for Greenwich Palace, Henry VIII’s main London residence.  The village and house are both worth a visit, again with lovely grounds and gardens.

Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire

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We often have guests going to see Lacock as it was used in one of the Harry Potter films.  In Wolf Hall it appears as the corridors in Wolf Hall

Great Chalfield Manor, Wiltshire

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Built between 1465 and 1480 this is used as Austin Friars, Thomas Cromwell’s home; it’s another National Trust property which opens in April. There are wonderful romantic gardens that offer terraces, topiary houses, gazebo, lily pond, roses and views across the spring-fed fishpond.  Cross the upper moat, passing barns, gatehouse and delightful parish church to enjoy fine oriel windows and the soldiers, griffons and monkey adorning the rooftops.

There are also tours of the manor house that should not be missed.

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